Public Safety X

PublicSafetyX

Protesters march on April 30 from Baltimore’s Sandtown neighborhood to City Hall, demanding better police accountability and racial equality following the death of Freddie Gray. (Andrew Burton / Getty Images)

Protesters march on April 30 from Baltimore’s Sandtown neighborhood to City Hall, demanding better police accountability and racial equality following the death of Freddie Gray. (Andrew Burton / Getty Images)

At Reboot Safety, we spend a good chunk of our time testing ideas and thinking up new ways to redesign public safety. During our Toronto Reboot in October of 2016, a common issue that arose repeatedly was the desire to contact public safety responders without necessarily calling 911 or having armed police respond. Due to the recent events of unarmed civilians being shot at and killed by police at such alarming rates, it’s no surprise that community members are looking for more options. One group over the Reboot weekend decided to tackle this problem with a project titled PublicSafetyX.

The team imagined a world where we could, with the press of a button, have the preferred and correct safety response team assist an individual in need. While the technology to do so already exists, it’s currently being used to request rides and deliver food. What if we used that technology to support a safe community?

PublicSafetyX proposes a way for public safety to be just as accessible and available as that late night burrito any number of on-demand services offer.

 

Phase 1: Have the user identify what the problem is. Each category is tied to city-specific public safety groups (ex. police or fire department, ambulance, animal control, etc.)

Users can select as many services as needed and also supply additional information.

Phase 2: Users are then prompted to verify that the services they’re requesting for and their location are correctly reported.

Using the phone’s GPS, PublicSafetyX can pinpoint an exact location for response teams to report to. Similar to other on-demand services, this helps send the request to the nearest qualified responder.

 

Phase 3: Once submitted, the user receives a confirmation of the public safety report along with an estimated arrival time and instructions to move to a safer location.

 

Phase 4: Once the reported issue is resolved, the user receives a digital record with the details of the request along with the opportunity to rate the responders.

Feedback goes directly to the public safety team that responded

PublicSafetyX isn’t a comprehensive solution just yet, but it’s the beginning of an idea and a conversation that we all should be having: how can we use our existing technology to solve the problems we’re facing in our community?

We want to hear your ideas and test out different solutions. If interested in joining the conversation and/or hopping on any of our existing projects, shoot us an email at hello@rebootsafety.tech!